Depending on your company's holiday policy, you may wish to include public holidays in the amount of time off that people can book.

Excluding public holidays from allowances (non-deductible)

What this means

By default, Charlie does not deduct public holidays from people's individual time off allowance. This can be simpler to manage for companies without part-time team members.

Excluding public holidays from allowances means, for example: if your default company allowance is 28 days, then a UK-based, full-time team member will automatically get:

  • 28 bookable days each year

  • 8 additional bank holidays each year

These public holidays don't count towards their "total days used" in Charlie.

How to set this up in CharlieHR

You don't have to make any changes as this is the default setting!

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Including public holidays in allowances (deductible)

What this means

If your company policy is to include public holidays in the amount of time people can book off, here's how you can set that up in Charlie.

For example: if your default company allowance is 28 days, then a UK-based, full-time team member will automatically get:

  • 20 bookable days each year

  • 8 pre-approved bank holidays each year

How to set this up in CharlieHR

To change your public holidays to deductible:

  1. Expand 'Time' in the left hand side navigation.

  2. Click on 'Settings'

  3. Scroll down to 'Default Company Allowance' section

  4. Select 'Edit'

  5. Set the switch next to 'Deductible Public Holiday' to on

  6. Confirm by clicking on 'Update' and saving the setting

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Setting different public holidays for each office

Each of your offices can have its own set of public or national holidays, which will be included or excluded from team members' allowances based on your company setting.

Alternatively, you can turn public holidays off completely for an office, which stops them from displaying or being factored into people's time off calculations.

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